4 ways to make your gap year experiences sound employable

My biggest regret was going straight from graduation into a job. Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t really have the funds to go travelling the world so my hands were tied, however, if you are in the fortunate position to have the option – absolutely take it. Just think about how employable it’s going to make you…

Sorry, that was really sinister. I didn’t mean to infer that a gap year would made you unemployable, in some cases, it might give you the edge to get a leg up on the competition.

That said, there is an old-age belief that gap years are just an expensive way to put off getting a job and don’t really benefit you as a potential employee. Your job is to convince your interviewer otherwise!

Here are four ways to make your gap year experiences sound close to employable.

1. Slip in some volunteering


When interviewers hear ‘gap year’, I bet they think: ‘there better be some volunteering here’. There’s an air of cynicism associated with middle-class young people volunteering over-seas. Many will coarsely deem it self-serving which, in some cases, it can be. However, there’s no reason it can’t be both fulfilling and employable.

2. Motivation


Providing you didn’t just go on a jolly with Daddy’s credit card, planning and executing a gap year takes some serious grit and motivation. Especially off of the back of university, the three most lethargic years you’ll ever go through. However, when you return home, a little bit of work and routine will really go down well.

3. Teach English


Dammit it’s so cliché but also so effective. Teaching English is the easiest way to show that you’re committed to helping people, have teaching skills and are intuitive enough to bag yourself a part-time job in a country where English isn’t the first language.

4. Blogging


If you’re going for any job in the media sector, maintaining a blog will, one, look good on a CV and, two, keep your writing chops up. If you need some advice regarding travel blogging, ask our resident columnist and blogger, Lara Lain.