One Year After Making A Murderer: Where Are They Now?

It's been a year since the Netflix series, Making A Murderer, went viral. But what's the latest with Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey...?

This time last year, the seed was being planted and our obsession with Making A Murderer was just starting to grow.

Launched to Netflix in December of 2015, it didn’t take long for celebrities and internet users alike to get drawn into the lives (and convictions) of Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey, birthing a true crime obsession that continued through to this year.

See: Gigi Hadid Has Strong Opinions About Making A Murderer

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The ten-part series explored the case surrounding the murder of Teresa Halbach (whose family have strongly criticised the documentary), the conviction of Steven and his nephew Brendan, and a commentary on the justice system.

Before the series, most of the world knew nothing about this particular case. But once word spread, more than 500,000 people reportedly signed a petition asking the White House to pardon Avery, and the internet continued to be outraged with every update that emerged throughout 2016.

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So, where are Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey now?

The short answer: they are both still in prison.

Steven Avery is now 53-years-old, and is still appealing his conviction. The MaM subject continues to protest his innocence, alleging that he was wrongfully convicted.

Throughout this year, a number of people close to him broke their silence in the wake of the documentary – including two of his sons. Avery’s new lawyer, Kathleen Zellner, has been working closely with him to try and clear his name, posting updates to Twitter, and even sharing notes that Avery has written to his supporters from behind bars.

Meanwhile, Brendan Dassey, now 27, has had his conviction overturned by a federal judge, but still remains in jail.

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Brendan Dassey is still in prison, and is looking very different these days…

He was 16-years-old when he was first charged following a confession, which he later recanted. The teen, who was described in the show as having learning disabilities, has since denied having anything to do with the crime, claiming that his confession was coerced.

Prosecutors are looking to appeal the decision to overturn his conviction.

This story is very much set to continue into 2017, with filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos documenting both appeals processes for a second season of Making A Murderer.

We’ll see you next year.