8 times businesswoman and fashion icon Natalie Massenet has inspired us

Natalie Massenet, the founder of the revolutionary Net-A-Porter, is a truly inspirational woman. Since starting her empire back in 2000, she has become one of the greatest British-based entrepreneurs ever.

Here are the most inspirational life lessons that Massenet has taught us over the years, rounded up by Marie Claire.

Image Credit: Rex Features

Image Credit: Rex Features

1. On what to wear to work

‘Be the smartest at the table and you can wear whatever you want.’

With Anna Wintour (Image Credit: Rex Features)

With Anna Wintour (Image Credit: Rex Features)

2. On success

‘Success begins at that magical moment when you declare to yourself, your friends, and the universe that you believe you can do something different.’

Image Credit: Rex Features

Image Credit: Rex Features

3. On failure

‘Having the positive belief that it will all be OK just means that you hustle and make it work because failure is not even an option in your own mind.’

Image Credit: Rex Features

Image Credit: Rex Features

4. On ambition

‘My personal ambition remains the same – to be creative, to be modern, to stay one step ahead, to enjoy life.’

5. Will Natalie get poached by a tech giant just like Angela AhrendtsHere’s what she said on the growing industry a few months ago.

‘I think fashion is actually very good training for being in the tech world, because it’s all about moving on to the next thing, looking for the next thing, not getting stuck in the past.’

Image Credit: Rex Features

Image Credit: Rex Features

6. On entrepreneurs

‘As an entrepreneur, what drives you has to be the good news; otherwise, you just don’t get out of bed.’

7. On positivity

‘Always go into meetings or negotiations with a positive attitude. Tell yourself you’re going to make this the best deal for all parties.’

Image Credit: Rex Features

Image Credit: Rex Features

8. Defending the fashion industry

‘British fashion is a serious business. The British fashion industry is worth £21bn to the U.K. economy and employs 819,000 people across the country.‘