“I went from a PA to owning my own successful business”

“When you look back on your life, the time spent in unfulfilling positions won’t matter or be an important thing. The only things that will matter to you are the things that you felt you missed out on.”

Desperate to get our of your awful job but scared to take the leap? Quitting our boring jobs to start a business doing exactly what we want is something we all daydream about. But you know what? That daydream could become a reality NOW.

We chatted to Ida, an entrepreneur and the founder of Bleecker Raine, about how she quit her job as a PA to start her flower business. It’s more do-able that you think and you are going to be totally inspired by her advice!

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Image Credit: Bleecker Raine

1. Why did you decide to make a career change?

I had been a PA for over 5 years, predominantly in the finance and real estate fields and never felt fulfilled by or happy with my career. I spent a long time trying to come up with a business idea in order to escape the corporate 9-5, but found it difficult to find something I thought I could remain completely committed to. It was only when I broke it down and started to think about the things I felt I was good at, was passionate about, the things that have consistently played a part in my life and brought me joy; it became a complete no brainer. I realised I had been searching for ideas in all the wrong places and hadn’t previously realised I could make flowers my career.

2. What is a typical working day like for you?

The beauty of my job is that there is no such thing as a typical working day. I could be getting up and out to the flower market for 3.30am on a Monday and spending that day creating arrangements for private or commercial clients, on the Tuesday I could be up at 9am responding to emails, taking orders and personally delivering bunches, and the Wednesday could be spent meeting with brides and potential clients. I love that my job is so varied and that no two days are the same.

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Image Credit: Bleecker Raine

3. What would your advice be for someone wanting to do what they love, but feeling unable to make the leap?

At the age of 50, 60, 70 years old, when you look back on your life, the time spent in unfulfilling positions won’t matter or be an important thing. The only things that will matter to you are the things that you felt you missed out on or had been unable to pursue. Start with baby steps towards achieving your ultimate goal and research, research, research. Realise that you can always go back to doing what you were doing before if it got to that point, but taking the plunge to do what you are passionate about and love could change your life entirely for the better. It’s a cliché, but life is short. Why should you spend it doing the things that you don’t absolutely love?

4. How are you hoping to grow the business?

Getting your name out there is no easy feat! I have been doing a number of things in the name of growing my business from sending bouquets to bloggers, PR companies and celebrities to hosting a pop up shop in Covent Garden. Social media has also proven to be very effective with the likes of Instagram, Twitter and Facebook being a great tool in reaching a wide audience. The next step for me will be opening my own flower shop in Victoria in mid-August which is both terrifying and incredibly exciting, but I just can’t wait.

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Image Credit: Bleecker Raine

5. What was the thinking behind why you wanted to start Bleecker Raine?

Flowers have always played an important part in my life which ultimately stemmed from my mother’s love for them. We always had flowers in the house and a garden in full bloom. From a young age, there was an emphasis placed on the significance in giving or receiving flowers on special occasions, when turning up at a dinner party or sending them to someone who was unwell. The joy it brought to people stuck with me and being naturally creatively minded, working with them was always a dream. The thought of looking at beautiful flowers on a daily basis became far more appealing that looking at a computer screen.

business

Image Credit: Bleecker Raine