Want to get into the music industry? This is how these people did it

Are you chained to your desk each day at work, daydreaming about a career as a pop star? Or a DJ? Or even in Music PR? Well, whatever music industry career you are lusting over, we’re here to help you get there.

These four twentysomethings, who are all working in the music world, are here to inspire you. Nobody finds their dream career – they make it. These guys are proof of that.


Dua Lipa

Image Credit: Instagram @dualipa

Image Credit: Instagram @dualipa

After releasing her hit debut single, ‘New Love’ earlier this year, Dua Lipa is one of the coolest new artists you NEED to know about. She’s also just been longlisted for the BBC Music Sound Of 2016 Poll. Pretty amazing, right?

“We’re at a great place in time, especially in music, where you can be who you are and own it! I just love having fun and being free. Being able to put that into my music is the best. I’d say musically my sound is dark pop. I’ve been strongly influenced by hip hop too. My new single ‘Be The One’ was produced by London-based electronic producer Digital Farm Animals, and the video was directed by Nicole Nodland, who has worked with Lana Del Rey and Paz de La Huerta.”

Read the full interview here.


Raleigh Ritchie

Image Credit: Instagram @raleighritchie

Image Credit: Instagram @raleighritchie

Lots of people dream about becoming a singer or an actor, but not many achieve success in either industry, let alone both. But that’s what happened to Jacob Anderson aka Raleigh Ritchie. From releasing his own brand of alt-R&B music on major label Columbia to starring in HBOs fantasy drama Game of Thrones as leader of The Unsullied, Grey Worm – his career is really taking off.

“I get to do for a job what I would do for free. I can afford to write songs for a living and I get to go and do shows where people sing my songs back to me. It’s insane. The tough part though is the general day to day politics and intricacies of being a music artist nowadays, it’s is enough to give you a headache. You want to be able to just write music and release it and have as many people as possible like it, but it’s never as simple as that.”

Read the full interview here.


Hannah Braid

Image Credit: Hannah Braid

Image Credit: Hannah Braid

Having always dreamed of opening her own architect practice, Hannah Braid went to study architecture at Leeds University. Like many of us, she thought she knew exactly what her career path would look like. Until, that is, she discovered her love of music. That’s when everything changed. Now Hannah is a co-founder of PR agency Swell Publicity, and she looks after some of the coolest artists around including Laura Welsh and Billie Marten.

“One moment will stick with me for a long time. It was the day before my final hand in at uni, yet somehow I escaped the depths of the library and headed downstairs to catch a glimpse of Lianne La Havas, playing in our student union for Live At Leeds in 2012. If memory serves me right, Marina & The Diamonds couldn’t make it and Lianne was main support. It was my first time using guest lists to get into a gig, through my then very small blog. That night I reviewed Lianne and it went onto be my most read article on the site, so much so that after Bestival that same year, Lianne walked off stage and personally thanked me for being one of her first reviewers.”

Read the full interview here.


Charlotte Devaney

Image Credit: Instagram @charlotte_devaney

Image Credit: Instagram @charlotte_devaney

London-born Charlotte Devaney, 27, first hit the big time when she acted in Simon Pegg’s 2008 blockbuster ‘How To Lose Friends and Alienate People‘. She then began to DJ on the club circuit in 2007, and has played to packed out crowds the world over ever since. Now she’s released her debut single with rap mogul Snoop Dogg, and is only looking up.

“I started out on the radio. I had my own show on an internet radio station and then started playing in clubs a couple of years after that to build up my confidence. I practiced hard for months learning to mix and it took me a long time to really feel comfortable behind the decks.”

Read the full interview here.