We’re All Making These Mistakes Within The First 10 Minutes Of Work

How does that expression go? “Start as you mean to go on”. There’s a lot of truth to this cliché. You know those days when you just wake up on the wrong side of the bed and nothing can be done to quell your bad mood? What if there was a way to correct this?

The first 10-30 minutes after getting into work, especially at the beginning of the week, can pretty much determine how the rest of your day is going to pan out.

This has nothing to do with timings or how quickly you work but rather your general attitude.

When you arrive at work, there are certain safeguards you should always tend to in order to avoid getting sucked into a vortex of trying to clear your never-ending inbox or putting your body through caffeine withdrawals.

We could all do mornings better and we can by avoiding these mistakes…

Not greeting your colleagues

If you’ve ever played The Sims, you’ll know that humans are inherently social creatures. We’re all for having our own space but our brains are programmed to stimulate off social interactions.

Small talk is a chore but you can really turn a bad mood around by spending some time with a chipper acquaintance.

Being a coffee fiend

Cool, we get it, you need coffee. But if you’re that kind of person you guzzles some a volcanic cup of mud as soon as you’re through the door, you don’t know a thing about the drink you worship.

Research found that drinking coffee first thing is pointless. Drinking coffee after 9:30 means that you’ll become less dependent on caffeine and it will provide a bigger kick within minutes.

Clearing the easy tasks first

People associate that clearing a larger quantity of tasks in the morning with being productive. However, since your energy dwindles as the day goes on, you’re much better working on one important thing in the morning and putting the smaller tasks on the back-burner – even if they’re a little bit late.

Meetings

Morning meetings are a waste of everyone’s time. You have a limited time of prime cognitive function in the mornings, why spend it sitting in a room running through information that could be shared in the afternoon or over email?