Your Juicy Couture Tracksuit Is Now In A Museum

If you’re a Noughties girl like us, then it’s official, you’re old! Old enough in fact that the most iconic piece of clothing from your youth is now being showcased in a museum. Whether you owned one or just worshipped the ‘It’ girls that did, the Juicy Couture tracksuit is now officially a piece of fashion history. How depressing!

That’s right, the V&A’s upcoming exhibition entitled ‘Undressed: A Brief History Of Underwear’ – which opens in April – features, alongside vintage corsets and Kate Moss’ infamous naked dress, a bright pink Juicy Couture tracksuit from 2004.

READ: 19 Things Every Noughties Schoolgirl Will Remember

While you may not have placed your favourite outfit of the Noughties in the underwear category (your wore it outside too right?), it has been included as a contextual piece of clothing to showcase underwear from different time periods.

Kim and Khloe Kardashian in Juicy Couture tracksuits. The Kardashias were also big fans of the velour tracksuit.

READ: 11 Noughties’ Outfits Kim Kardashian Wore

If you aren’t already aware of the iconic place the tracksuit has in our fashion history – yes fashion really – then you will be now. Coming in a rainbow of colours and in a variety of fabrics, from terrycloth to velour, the tracksuit often featured the word ‘Juicy’ on the bum in diamante letters and was most stylishly paired with Ugg boots and lashings of lipgloss. Ladies like Britney Spears, Nicole Richie and Paris Hilton had one in every colourway possible and epitomised the style.

Charlotte Church and Lindsay Lohan in their Juicy Couture tracksuits. Charlotte Church and Lindsay Lohan were also in the Juicy Couture club.

Although you can still get your hands on a Juicy Couture tracksuit today, the outlet announced earlier this year that it would be closing all US stores and now that the tracksuit has found itself in a museum, we might be able to assume that the trend has had it’s heyday. But that’s not to say it won’t be remembered very, very fondly.

By Amy de Klerk