This Weird New Hair Colour Technique Uses Glass

Move over balyagae, this new hair colour technique may sound crazy but it has been producing some seriously cool results on Instagram.

Rather than painting colour onto the hair either free hand or using foils, Chiala Marvici, the Redken colourist who created the technique, uses a sheet of glass to dye her clients hair, madness we know!

You’re probably wondering how on earth Chiala came up with the strange idea, and it turns out it actually happened while she was asleep. ‘I know it sounds strange, but I had a dream where I saw multiple layers of patterns and sheets of colour, one in front of the other,” she said. She woke up and it occurred to her just how perfectly it would translate onto hair, and just like that, hand-pressed colouring was born!

The first step is painting the dye onto the glass The first step is painting the dye onto the glass

 

So, how does the cool colour technique work? First Chiala hand paints blobs and smears onto a sheet of glass using different dyes in different sections so she can create the multi-tonal finish. She then lays the hair on top, pressing it into the dye using a plastic hand-press.

Next she swipes over the hair, pushing it into the dye Next she swipes over the hair, pushing it into the dye

The whole process takes about 20 minutes and then she leaves the colour to develop for another 30. But what makes using the glass so special? “The technique allows the colourist to create multiple layers and patterns to create a multidimensional feel,” she says.

The end results are amazing! The end results are amazing!

The result is blurred, multidimensional colour that makes the hair shimmer in the light and appear a whole lot shiner. While we had planned to book in for the hand-press in our local salon, we’re not sure that the technique has caught on just yet, but Chiala has been educating colourits all over America, so we can only hope it will make it to the UK sooner rather than later!

Watch the video here on Chiala’s Instagram to see the hand-pressed technique in action.